What are Country Code Top-Level Domains (ccTLD)?

Country-code TLDs (ccTLDs) represent specific geographic locations. For example: .mx represents Mexico and .eu represents the European Union. Some ccTLDs have residency restrictions. For example, .eu requires registrants to live or be located in a country belonging to the European Union. Other ccTLDs, like the ccTLD .it representing Italy, allow anyone to register them, but require a trustee service if the registrant is not located in a specified country or region. Finally, there are ccTLDs that can be registered by anyone — .co representing Colombia, for example, has no residency requirements at all. A .ac — Ascension Island .ad — Andorra .ae — United Arab Emirates .af — Afghanistan .ag — Antigua and Barbuda .ai — Anguilla .am — Armenia .an — Antigua and Barbuda .ao — Angola .aq —…
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What are top-level domains (TLD)?

A top-level domain (TLD) is the part of the domain name located to the right of the dot (" . "). The most common TLDs are .com, .net, and .org. Some others are .biz, .info, and .ws. These common TLDs all have certain guidelines, but are generally available to any registrant, anywhere in the world. ICANN identifies the following categories of TLDs: Country-code top-level domains (ccTLD) -- Each ccTLD identifies a particular country and is two letters long. The ccTLD for the United States, for example, is .us Infrastructure top-level domain -- There is only one TLD in this group, ARPA (Address and Routing Parameter Area). The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) manages this TLD for the IETF. Sponsored top-level domains (sTLD): These are overseen by private organizations. Generic top-level…
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